Number of EI beneficiaries down again in February

Fastest declines in Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba
|hrreporter.com|Last Updated: 04/19/2011

The number of people receiving regular employment insurance benefits was down in February, according to Statistics Canada.

There were 628,900 people who received EI, down 8,300 or 1.3 per cent from January and a fifth consecutive monthly decrease. The number of beneficiaries declined in all provinces except Prince Edward Island.

Over the past five months, the number of beneficiaries has been trending down in all provinces.

The fastest rate of monthly decline in beneficiaries occurred in Saskatchewan, where it fell 5.1 per cent (down 600) to 11,200 from January. At the same time, the number decreased in Alberta by 2.9 per cent (down 1,300) to 43,100 recipients. In Manitoba, it declined by 2.7 per cent (down 390) to 14,300.

In Quebec, 180,300 people received benefits in February, down 1.5 per cent (or 2,800) from January, while in Ontario, the number of beneficiaries edged down 0.6 per cent (down 1,100) to 191,500.

The number of people receiving regular benefits in February remained virtually unchanged in Prince Edward Island at 8,500 (or 0.1 per cent).

The number of claims submitted for EI provides an indication of the number of people who could become beneficiaries. The number of initial and renewal claims totalled 239,000 in February, down 2,700 or 1.1 per cent from January. This was the third decline in four months, said Statistics Canada.

There were fewer claims in Manitoba, New Brunswick, Alberta, British Columbia and Quebec in February, while the number increased in Saskatchewan and Ontario.

Demographic groups

Between February 2010 and February 2011, the number of men receiving regular EI benefits fell by 12.7 per cent or 74,600, continuing the downward trend of year-over-year declines that began in March 2010.

The number of male beneficiaries declined by 14.8 per cent (or 59,000) among those aged 25 to 54, and by 14.5 per cent (or 11,000) for men under 25 years old. The decline was much slower among men aged 55 and over, at 4.1 per cent (or 4,600).

For women, the rate of decrease in the number of beneficiaries was 8.5 per cent (down 23,900), the largest of nine consecutive year-over-year percentage decreases.

The number of female beneficiaries fell by 15.1 per cent (or 3,500) among those under 25 years old, and by 10.2 per cent (or 21,000) among women aged 25 to 54. In contrast, the number of female beneficiaries aged 55 and over edged up by one per cent (or 540).

Continued year-over-year declines in most large centres

Between February 2010 and February 2011, the number of regular beneficiaries fell by 98,600 (11.3 per cent) at the national level, with decreases in 129 of the 143 large centres that have a population of 10,000 or more.

In Newfoundland and Labrador, the number of beneficiaries declined in all five large centres. The fastest rate of decrease occurred in St. John's, which fell by 12.4 per cent (or 800) to 5,600, the 11th consecutive month of year-over-year declines.

The number of regular beneficiaries fell in 31 of 33 large centres in Quebec between February 2010 and February 2011. The fastest declines occurred in Saint-Georges, Sorel-Tracy, Granby, La Tuque and Rouyn-Noranda. There were 12.3 per cent fewer beneficiaries (down 10,700) in Montréal, the 12th consecutive month of year-over-year declines. In the census metropolitan area of Quebec, the number of beneficiaries declined by 5.6 per cent (or 870) compared with February 2010.

In Ontario, the number of regular beneficiaries has fallen in 38 of its 41 large centres since February 2010. The largest percentage declines occurred in Greater Sudbury, Tillsonburg, Belleville, Guelph and Thunder Bay. In Greater Sudbury, 44.4 per cent fewer people (or 2,600) received regular benefits, the eighth consecutive monthly year-over-year decline. In Toronto, 81,100 people received benefits in February, down 18.3 per cent (or 18,100) from the same month a year earlier.

In Manitoba, the fastest decline over the past 12 months occurred in Winnipeg, down 17.0 per cent to 8,200 in February.

The number of beneficiaries decreased in all eight large centres in Saskatchewan. The most notable rates of decline occurred in Yorkton and Moose Jaw. In Regina, the number of beneficiaries decreased by 19.9 per cent (or 420) to 1,700, while in Saskatoon, 18.1 per cent (or 550) fewer people received benefits.

In Alberta, 11 of the 12 large centres had fewer beneficiaries in February compared with February 2010. The pace of decline in the number of beneficiaries was fastest in Brooks, Camrose, Red Deer, Grande Prairie and Calgary. In Calgary, the number of beneficiaries fell by 30.2 per cent (or 6,100) to 14,000, while in Edmonton, it declined by 16.2 per cent (or 2,900) to 14,900. February marked the 11th consecutive monthly year-over-year decline for both CMAs.

In British Columbia, most large centres had fewer beneficiaries in February than the same month a year earlier. The rate of decline was most pronounced in Fort St. John, Quesnel and Prince George. In Vancouver, 33,400 people received regular benefits in February, down 11 per cent (or 4,100), the ninth year-over-year monthly decline in a row. The number of beneficiaries fell by 5.6 per cent (or 250) to 4,300 in Victoria, the 11th consecutive monthly year-over-year decline.

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