Two-thirds of Canadian employees don’t see office romances as problematic: Survey

But nearly one-half think involved parties should work in different departments
|hrreporter.com|Last Updated: 07/12/2012

Much like the sizzling temperatures of the season, office romance is heating up workplaces and the majority of Canadian employees support the idea of an office romance.

In Canada, six in 10 employees (59 per cent) indicate a romantic relationship between colleagues occurs from time to time within their organization and two-thirds (66 per cent) believe this need not be problematic, according to the results of Randstad's latest Global Workmonitor, surveying at least 400 employees from each of the 32 participating countries around the world. Globally, 72 per cent of respondents believe romantic relationships in the workplace do not need to be problematic.

"People spend a significant amount of time in the office and it is often a place where people feel a sense of community. The company is likely filled with people who share the same values, principles, work ethic, skills and education, so it's not that surprising that romances tend to spark between employees," said Stacy Parker, executive vice-president of marketing at Randstad

The results are similar around the world. On average, 57 per cent of global respondents indicate romantic relationships occur in the workplace from time to time. This happens more often in China, India and Malaysia (all around 70 per cent). In Japan (33 per cent) and Luxembourg (36 per cent) however, romantic relationships in the workplace are reportedly less common.

"Many employers frown on office relationships for good reason. It can disrupt productivity not only for those in the relationship, but those who work with the couple. It can also hurt morale if favoritism between the couple is perceived, or if the relationship ends very badly," said Parker.

In Canada, 37 per cent believe a romantic relationship with a colleague interferes with their performance at work. On a global average, 40 per cent of employees share that view. The concern is much higher for employees in India (63 per cent) and Luxembourg (65 per cent) when it comes to the belief that romantic relationships interfere with work performance.

The results also found that when a romantic relationship does occur, 44 per cent of global respondents believe one of the two must be transferred to another department. Canadian employees hold a similar stance as 42 per cent believe that in the event of a romantic relationship at work, one of the two must be transferred to another department.

The consensus is however, is that resignation is a step too far when it comes to office romance. Globally, only 24 per cent feel that one of the two should resign from their job when romantically involved. While in Canada, 21 per cent believe that one of the two should resign in the event of a romantic relationship at work.

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