Tech industry to see highest starting salary increases in 2013: Survey

Above-average salary increases expected for HR
|hrreporter.com|Last Updated: 10/26/2012

Starting salaries in the technology sector will see the largest increase — 4.5 per cent — in 2013, according to the 2013 Salary Guides by Robert Half International.

Mobile applications developers will see the highest increases (an average of nine per cent), as companies look for people to help them build business using mobile media. Network engineers, business intelligence analysts, and senior IT auditors also are in demand.

"Demand for specialized talent continues to persist within many professional occupations, including technology and accounting," said Lara Dodo, a Canadian regional vice-president at Robert Half. "As many in-demand positions remain hard to fill, companies need to offer competitive compensation to attract the best employees."

Administrative and office support professionals are expected to see base compensation rise by 3.9 per cent, on average, for 2013. Employers are refilling some roles and creating new ones to ready themselves for future growth. Positions in demand include executive assistants and customer service representatives.

Above-average salary increases also are projected for select administrative positions in human resources, with increases ranging from 3.4 per cent to four per cent, said Robert Half.

Accounting and finance professionals can anticipate a boost of 2.2 per cent in 2013. There is a particular need for financial analysts who can support growth opportunities, as well as staff and senior accountants. In the health-care industry, financial professionals with knowledge of health informatics and those who maintain and provide financial data are being hired to handle initiatives related to the collection of electronic medical information.

In financial services, there is demand for risk and compliance professionals who can interpret evolving regulatory requirements, found the salary guides.

Add Comment

  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *