57 per cent of workers believe employers have responsibility to provide cancer support

Just 1 in 5 have access to such services: Survey
|hrreporter.com|Last Updated: 03/07/2013

Few Canadians working full-time with an employee benefits package report that they have access to cancer support services, but more than one-half (57 per cent) feel it is the employers’ responsibility to include these services as part of their benefits, according to a new Ipsos Reid survey of 1,000 Canadians.

Cancer support services advise individuals on their diagnosis, test results, treatment and other challenges when dealing with cancer. Almost two-thirds (64 per cent) of fully employed Canadians with benefits report they, or someone close to them, have been affected by cancer, but nearly one-half (46 per cent) don’t know if they have access to cancer support services through their employee benefits package.

More than one-third (38 per cent) report they do not have access, with only less than one in five (17 per cent) reporting they have access.

When asked whether they have adequate access to cancer support services, one-half (49 per cent) report that they don’t know, while over one-third (36 per cent) report they do not have adequate cancer support services.

Two-thirds (65 per cent) believe that cancer support services are a valued component of an employee benefits package, while one in 10 (13 per cent) disagree.

Respondents who report that they or someone close to them have been affected by cancer are more likely to report that cancer support services are a valued component of an employee benefits package (70 per cent), compared to those who did not report being affected by cancer (56 per cent).

More than one-half (57 per cent) of employed Canadians also believe that the inclusion of cancer support services in an employee benefits package is a good way to retain employees and attract top talent.

Demographic and regional differences:

Canadians with incomes of less than $30,000 are the most likely to report that they do not have access (53 per cent) to cancer support services through their employee benefits package

•Canadians aged 35 to 54 (68 per cent) and those aged 55 and over (70 per cent) are the most likely to feel these services are a valued component of a benefits package.

•Residents of British Columbia (41 per cent) are the least likely to believe that their employer has a responsibility to include these services in an employer benefits package, compared to residents of Saskatchewan/Manitoba (67 per cent) who are the most likely.

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