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Jan 28, 2013

39 per cent of U.S. employers worried top talent will leave

Salary, flexibility, challenging work appreciated by workers: Survey
    
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Nearly one-third (32 per cent) of employers in the United States saw their top performers leave in 2012 and 39 per cent are concerned they’ll lose top talent in 2013, according to a survey by CareerBuilder.

And while most workers (66 per cent) said they are generally satisfied with their jobs, 25 per cent said they will change jobs in 2013 or 2014, according to the survey of 3,991 workers.

While upward mobility is a key factor in job satisfaction and employee retention, having a certain title isn’t important to 55 per cent of workers — the vast majority (88 per cent) said salary matters more.

Other factors that outrank job title in what is most important to workers are:

•a flexible schedule (59 per cent)

•being able to make a difference (48 per cent)

•challenging work (35 per cent)

•the ability to work from home (33 per cent)

•academic reimbursement (18 per cent)

•having an office (17 per cent)

•a company car (14 per cent).

The one perk that would make their workplace more satisfying:

• half-day Fridays (40 per cent)

• an on-site fitness centre (20 per cent)

• the ability to wear jeans (18 per cent)

• daily catered lunches (17 per cent)

• massages (16 per cent)

• a nap room (12 per cent)

• rides to and from work (12 per cent)

•a snack cart that comes around the office (eight per cent)

•a private restroom (seven per cent)

• an on-site daycare (six per cent).

“What determines job satisfaction is not a one-size-fits-all but flexibility, recognition, the ability to make a difference and, yes, even special perks, can go a long way,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice-president of human resources at CareerBuilder. “Being compensated well will always be a top consideration, but we’re seeing work-life balance, telecommuting options and learning opportunities outweigh other job factors when an employee decides whether to stay with an organization.”

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