• Transcript

    This performance by the students of an all-girl public school in New York is aimed to ready them for a career in the fields Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, commonly known as STEM.
    Called Digital Dance, it pairs up student dancers with coders between the ages of 12 and 17 and is the brainchild of Andrea Chaves, who came up with the idea three years ago.
    SOUNDBITE: ANDREA CHAVES, STEAM CREATIVE DIRCTOR OF TYWLS, ASTORIA, SAYING (English)
    "Our girls love to dance. So I was observing that those girls were not doing the technology. So I have a group that is called Tech Room, and in that class I have coders, graphic designers, project managers and filmmakers. And when trying to linking these, in my mind somehow one day I just had an aha moment and I said, 'oh my God we could create a digital dance.'"
    Most of the moving pieces of technology are coded by students, who take on the subject in 6th grade.
    SOUNDBITE: ANDREA CHAVES, STEAM CREATIVE DIRCTOR OF TYWLS, ASTORIA, SAYING (English)
    "I think that coding is another language And it's always, if I know another language I can put it on my resume and I am more valuable."
    It also makes students feel more confident about their own capabilities.
    Seveteen-year old Tania Najnin programmed the rover to move in sync with the music.
    SOUNDBITE: TANIA NAJNIN STUDENT, 17-YEARS-OLD, JUNIOR AT TYWLS AND CODER OF ROBOT IN 2018 DIGITAL DANCE, SAYING (English)
    "It's not going to be hard unless you make it hard for yourself. So I decided that you know this is where I want to do in my future. And to girls who think that they can't do it they definitely can."
    According to the U.S. National Science Foundation women workers remain underrepresented in STEM, with the biggest gender gap found in engineering, with only 15 percent of the workforce being female in 2016.
    But these students are on the move to hopefully balance that number.