The weird workplace

Pizza Hut's cheesy hiring gimmick; Applebee's: A weird workplace hotspot; Worker's Facebook wish granted – unfortunately; Australian miners fired for dancing Harlem Shake underground; This may cut down on those pointless meetings; Cookies so good they're criminal
|Canadian HR Reporter|Last Updated: 03/26/2013

Cookies so good they’re criminal

PORTAGE, IND. — Oreo cookies can be pretty tasty. They can also be grounds for dismissal — and criminal charges — as one hungry Walmart employee in Indiana recently discovered. Penny Winters, 63, has been accused of stealing a bag of cookies from the store where she worked as part of the maintenance crew, according to the website the Smoking Gun. After finding an empty cookie wrapper, Walmart reviewed its surveillance video. According to a police report, the video showed Winters taking the bag, opening it and proceeding to “consume multiple cookies during her work shift.” She allegedly told a Walmart investigator she couldn’t afford to “legitimately purchase the food items.” Walmart is pressing felony charges against her.

Pizza Hut’s cheesy hiring gimmick

AUSTIN, TEXAS — Want to be Pizza Hut’s social media manager? You’ll have just 140 seconds to make an impression because that’s how long the job interview will last. Ripping on Twitter’s 140-character limit, the restaurant chain held auditions for the position of “pop culture guru” at the famed SXSW music festival earlier this month. The fast-talking candidate who lands the gig will “own” the company’s conversation strategy and advertising across all digital platforms, said Pizza Hut.

Applebee’s: A Weird Workplace hotspot

LAKEWOOD, COLO. — Something strange is afoot at Applebee’s. In the Feb. 25 issue, we reported an item about a waitress at a St. Louis Applebee’s who was stiffed on a tip by a pastor who wrote on her bill: “I give God 10 per cent. Why do you get 18?” Now, a waitress at a Colorado restaurant got quite the surprise while checking the ID of a customer — it was her own licence. Her wallet had been stolen during a night out about two weeks prior. The waitress, upon seeing her own photo staring back at her, remained calm, returned the ID and went back to get the woman’s drink. But instead of serving up a margarita, she phoned police. The customer — who was 26, didn’t need fake ID and had black hair (the waitress was blonde) — is facing numerous charges, including identity theft.

Worker’s Facebook wish granted – unfortunately

PHOENIX — Be careful what you wish for. That’s something Amy McClenathan, a former worker at a company in Arizona, knows all too well after she was fired for this Facebook posting: “I wish I could get fired some days, it would be easier to be at home than to have to go through this,” according to television station KTVK. The day after the post, she got her wish. McClenathan had been having a rough day at work, and it was also nearly the one-year anniversary of her mother’s death.

Australian miners fired for dancing Harlem Shake underground

SYDNEY (Reuters) — An Australian mining services company has fired up to 15 workers who performed an underground version of the Internet dance craze Harlem Shake and posted it online. The workers worked at the Agnew Mine in Western Australia owned by South African miner Gold Fields. They were employed by Barminco, an Australia-based underground services company, and management saw the dance as a breach of safety standards, said a spokesperson.

This may cut down on those pointless meetings

SARASOTA, FLA. — Ever wonder how much that boring meeting you’re sitting through is costing the company? Well, there’s an app for that. Meetr helps companies and employees calculate the cost of time spent by groups or individuals in meetings, conference calls or other events. Users enter meeting attendees and their estimated salary, and the app provides a running total of the cost of time spent during a particular event. Many first-time users are shocked at how expensive even a quick 15-minute meeting can be, said the developers.

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