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Alberta's whistleblower protection law in effect; Feds introduce mandatory reviews
|Canadian HR Reporter|Last Updated: 06/18/2013

Alberta’s whistleblower protection law in effect

EDMONTON — Alberta’s “landmark” whistleblower protection law came into effect June 1. The Public Interest Disclosure (Whistleblower Protection) Act, passed in the fall 2012 session of the legislature, protects public sector employees from job reprisal if they report wrongdoing. Any measure taken to adversely affect a whistleblower’s employment or working conditions will be met with fines of up to $25,000 for a first offence and up to $100,000 for subsequent offences, said the government. Under the legislation, public sector bodies are required to appoint a designated officer at their organization to investigate and resolve complaints by employees who report: violations of provincial or federal law; acts or omissions that create a danger to the public or environment; and gross mismanagement of public funds.

Feds introduce mandatory reviews

OTTAWA — The federal government is introducing a mandatory system for tracking employee performance. It’s meant to boost productivity and ensure a “modern, effective and efficient public service,” according to Tony Clement, president of the Treasury Board. “Either poor performers improve and become productive employees or we will let them go.” The Directive on Performance Management comes into effect on April 1, 2014, and applies to federal employees in the core public administration. Each federal organization will have to establish a program that includes: mandatory annual performance management objectives; mid-year evaluations; annual written employee performance assessments; and an action plan to support and guide employees to improve performance.

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