Weird Workplace

A 'super' expensive resignation; Pensions for prostitutes; Do you want crack with that?; Creative way to pay off student loan; Your orientation is better than this; Expats behaving badly
By Todd Humber
|Canadian HR Reporter|Last Updated: 02/25/2014

Do you want crack with that?

PITTSBURGH — A McDonald’s worker has been arrested, accused of dealing heroin in Happy Meal boxes to drive-thru customers who used the code phrase “I’d like to buy a toy,” according to Reuters. Shantia Dennis, 26, was charged with drug distribution after undercover officers conducted a controlled buy. They also seized a 50-unit bag of heroin from Dennis, plus 10 units purchased by plainclothes officers. It’s unclear how long the drug sales had been going on, and there was no indication the franchise owner was aware the drug deals were taking place. The worker was held on US$30,000 bail.

A ‘super’ expensive resignation

NEW YORK — GoDaddy, a company that provides website domains, aired a commercial during the recent Super Bowl in which a 36-year-old engineer quit her job. “I quit, Ted... Ciao, baby,” said Gwen Dean, from Yonkers, N.Y., in the 30-second spot, addressing her boss while mouthing the words with a blue furry hand puppet in a room full of puppets. GoDaddy put out a blind ad calling for people willing to publicly end their careers and Dean was chosen from 100, according to Reuters. Dean didn’t identify her employer or give the full name of her boss in the commercial, and she intends to email a formal resignation to her boss, according to GoDaddy. It may have been the most expensive resignation in history — Super Bowl ads in the United States cost about US$4 million for a 30-second spot.

Pensions for prostitutes

AMSTERDAM — Prostitutes in the Netherlands, where prostitution has been legal since 2002, are fighting for better pension rights, according to the BBC. Prostitutes are calling for the same pension rights as soccer players, saying that — like athletes — they do “difficult, physical work” in their prime years and their careers are short-lived. “It’s hard, physical work,” said a lawyer representing the women. “You know by 40, you’ll be doing something else.” In the Netherlands, soccer players are allowed to save 5,000 euros ($7,500 Cdn) per month tax-free.

Creative way to pay off student loan

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — When Rachel Kim graduated from Harvard Business School, she faced the crush of US$60,000 in student loans. To pay back the debt, she decided to sell herself to investors, according to CNN. She asked for US$100,000 in exchange for six per cent of her pre-tax income for the next decade, uploading information to a website called Upstart.com, including her transcripts, test scores, pay stubs, resumé and a photo. She had the full amount within a month from 36 investors and started her own business. Upstart was created by David Girouard, a former Google exec, after he saw too many young people held back by debt. It uses an algorithm to predict a person’s income over the next 10 years.

Your orientation is better than this

ROME — File this under “oops.” Soccer squad Bologna F.C. suspended four employees after they apparently forgot to pick up Ibson, a Brazilian star the team recently signed, at the airport. Ibson arrived at the airport in Italy but there was simply nobody there to pick him up, according to Reuters, and the club’s president was furious.

Expats behaving badly

SINGAPORE — Here’s something not to do while on assignment in a foreign land. A British wealth manager in Singapore is facing death threats, government criticism and public anger after his social media posts about mixing with “poor people” on public transit and being reunited with his Porsche went viral. The manager, Anton Casey, has hired a public relations firm in a bid to fend off the growing outrage over his Facebook posts, according to Reuters.

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